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HEMP
FOR VICTORY:
A GLOBAL

WARMING
SOLUTION

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By: Founder/Curator
Richard M. Davis

 
ABOUT THE CURATOR
 
MUSEUM STORE
 
HEMP ROOMS
 
AGRICULTURE
 
BIO-FUELS
 
BUILDING
MATERIALS
 
CANNABIS COMMENDATIONS
 
CHEMICAL
FEED STOCKS
 
ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS 
 
FOOD
PRODUCTS
 
HISTORY
 
LEGAL
MATTERS
 
LIBRARY
 
MEDICINE
& HEALTH
 
PAPER-PULP
 
PLASTICS
 
POLITICAL
MATTERS
 
RECREATION
& RELIGION  
 
ROPE & TWINE
 
TEXTILES
 
VARNISH
 & PAINT  
 
USA HEMP MUSEUM'S
OFFICE
 
BANNERS & LINKS
 
RICHARD M. DAVIS BLOG
 
HEMP FOR VICTORY NOW BLOG
 
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HISTORY This room is one of the most exciting in the museum because it shows history from a completely  different viewpoint, that of an association between people and a plant.  At some of the most important junctures of human civilization, in agriculture, transportation, exploration, communication, war, industry, invention, medicine, and art, hemp was there playing an important role as a basic resource.  For some of the history we will take you to different rooms of the Hemp Museum, but first a short overview of history with humans and hemp.  Let us begin way back in history.

AGRICULTURE Hemp was present at the dawn of human agriculture, thought to be some 10-15,000 years ago in the Middle East and China.  Hemp was reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Yearbook, 1914, to have been the first agricultural crop planted by humans for textile fibers.  Besides the cloth itself, a sample of which was dated at 9,000 years, is the record of pollen left behind at early human dwelling sites.

Of course in the middle east hemp grew wild, so it is likely it was used long before the age of agriculture for rope, twine, and fishnets.  Evidence of just such a human hemp culture comes from a History Channel report on the Scythians called the "Frozen Tombs of Siberia."

INDUSTRIAL HEMP FARMING ACT OF 2007

 

From the web project

A Peaceful Solution

By Willie & Amy Nelson

Sung by Rattlesnake Annie & Amy Nelson

MEDICINE HEALTH Hemp is a pain-reliever and an effective treatment for; anorexia, arthritis, asthma, epilepsy, AIDS, glaucoma, menstrual cramps, migraines, nausea and other ailments.  Hemp is a safer substitute for many over-the-counter and prescription medicines. The human brain appears to have receptors for hemp's active ingredient, THC.  And hemp medicine is now legal in California and six other states that have passed medical marijuana bills in some form.

FOOD PRODUCTS Edible hemp seeds are one of the most complete sources of vegetable protein available.  Hemp seed oil is lower in saturated fat and higher in essential fatty acids than any other vegetable or seed oil.   Imported from China, and now Canada, because American farmers are not allowed to compete on the world market with this high protein, excellent oil seed.     

Dr. Udo Erasmus, an internationally recognized nutritional authority on fats and oils, writes in his book "Fats that Heal - Fats that Kill:"

"Hemp seed oil may be nature's most perfectly balanced oil."

TEXTILES The textile room has over a thousand seconds of download time at 28.8 speed.  People made hemp fabric thousands of years before the advent of written language.  Hemp ropes and sails were the backbone of the sailing ship's service to people for 6,000 years.  Our first flag was made of sailcloth hemp.  My mother was born in the hemp growing state of Missouri, so she knew what hemp was from her family.  She did not know it was illegal to grow.  Scroll down through this room first.  I left a picture up for each sub-room so you could get an overview.

ROPE & TWINE Hemp rope, twine and fishnets probably predate the weaving of fabric.  Hemp rope and saddles set up a human to horse relationship that exists to the present. The oldest saddle ever found was made of hemp by the Scythians of the Siberian steppes, thousands of years ago. 

PAPER-PULP Every acre of hemp grown for paper or particle board saves four acres of trees. Hemp paper is more recyclable than tree paper, and its production does not require chlorine bleach or cause dioxin pollution.

The Hemp Paper Room is about much more than I ever expected. From the first discovery of writing or drawing,  people have looked for materials on which to write or  draw. Walls of caves, bones, bamboo strips, silk, clay  tablets, wood, metals, and papyrus (laminated grass  material) were written on for thousands of years prior to  the invention of papermaking.  True paper involves the use of pulped material in the manufacture of products.

BUILDING MATERIALS   FOOD, CLOTHING, AND SHELTER, could be called the big three creature comforts. Hemp can help in all three categories. Some building materials are relatively new owing to the machinery necessary to produce modern pressboard or plastics, but some are hundreds, some are thousands of years old.

Since the first woven fabric in antiquity was thought to be hemp, it is very likely that a hemp woven canvas tarp tossed across a hemp rope secured to two trees sheltered early hunters from the rain and made the first hemp shelter.

BIO-FUELS "Anything that can be made from hydrocarbons (oil, coal, natural gas), can be made from carbohydrates (plant material)." - source unknown.  HEMP BURNS AND THEREFORE PRODUCES ENERGY.

The U.S.A. Hemp Museum has been interested in fuels and energy from its start in 1990.   The curator spent many hours in the library of the California Energy Commission (C.E.C.) hoping to learn about biomass (plant matter) for fuels and energy.  During the 1992 election campaign I wrote an article called A NATURAL ENERGY POLICY, which is included in this section.  Among the things I learned from the C.E.C. was that Sacramento had a power plant not far from the Capitol built to burn biomass collected as waste tree, shrub, and grass trimmings. The plant was not in operation. As it was explained to me the green matter to be used as fuel was always too wet and irregular in composition to adequately fire the plant. California now has 33 biomass power plants in the state, operating mostly on forest logging waste.  These power plants could burn year round with hemp for energy.

CHEMICAL FEED STOCKS "Anything that can be made from hydrocarbons (oil, coal, natural gas), can be made from carbohydrates (plant material)." - source unknown.  HEMP BURNS AND THEREFORE PRODUCES ENERGY.

The U.S.A. Hemp Museum has been interested in fuels and energy from its start in 1990.   The curator spent many hours in the library of the California Energy Commission (C.E.C.) hoping to learn about biomass (plant matter) for fuels and energy.  During the 1992 election campaign I wrote an article called A NATURAL ENERGY POLICY, which is included in this section.  Among the things I learned from the C.E.C. was that Sacramento had a power plant not far from the Capitol built to burn biomass collected as waste tree, shrub, and grass trimmings. The plant was not in operation. As it was explained to me the green matter to be used as fuel was always too wet and irregular in composition to adequately fire the plant. California now has 33 biomass power plants in the state, operating mostly on forest logging waste.  These power plants could burn year round with hemp for energy.

VARNISH & PAINT  Artists of many cultures have painted with oil paints made of hemp seed oil on canvas (hemp).  This oil on canvas painting is from the new Getty Museum in Los Angeles.  Titled:  Bacchante with an Ape.  1627.  By Hendrick Ter Brugghen.  Many of the "old masters" painted on canvas.

PLASTICS "Anything that can be made from hydrocarbons (oil, coal, natural gas), can be made from carbohydrates (plant material)." - source unknown.

The above quote is again important because it dispels the notion that we are dependent upon fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas) for fuels, plastics and chemical feed-stocks in industry.

"Synthetic plastics were practically as old as agriculture itself.  They were made in the shadow of the pyramids from cooked starch, and celluloid collars antedated the twentieth century, but it took a world war to disclose their infinite potentialities to American industrialists.  From 1918 on, the chemical industry made greater technological advances than even the automobile or aviation, and the great chemical companies which fed it, by getting in early, rapidly built up fabulous fortunes." (p.323, GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER).

RECREATION & RELIGION   Lumping recreation and religion in a museum room is arbitrary, but in many ways this might be called the freedom room. The reason we have a hemp museum separate from the rest of natural history is that hemp is prohibited, illegal, and maligned as few natural living things have been in history.  I have been branded a criminal for doing what is my inalienable right to pursue, my inalienable right to happiness. 

ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS   The environmental benefits of the plant Cannabis sativa L. will be found in the many rooms of the U.S.A. Hemp Museum, but the importance of these benefits suggest we give them a room of their own. We live on a small planet, shared by more than six billion humans and more than two million other species. What we do as humans profoundly affects the quality of life for all these living beings.  From the start of agriculture, the village and civilization maybe only 15,000 years ago, people have learned to control their environment and were able to reproduce far beyond the natural order that had existed for millions, maybe billions of years.  Anyone who believes that the human population can not lay waste the planet earth has not taken a serious look at our handiwork, or at the billions of people in need of food and resources.  We need to buy time to turn the situation around.  The heroes of today and tomorrow on the earth will be those who forgo being parents for the good of the planet, our common home.

LEGAL MATTERS Hemp the Cannabis sativa plant, was legal for all uses to U.S. Citizens before the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937. What happened? How did the government take control of drug policy? How did the Prohibition of intoxicating liquor fit in to the story? What are the present arguments made to justify federal government control of drug policy? How are the laws changing? So many questions need answers.  The movement to re-legalize the hemp plant has had several surges in the past 63 years, including its use in World War II, the sixties revolution, the re-discovery of industrial uses of hemp and the Medical Marijuana movement.  Included in this section will be some of the artifacts of the effort to re-legalize the plant, buttons, bumper stickers, posters, fliers, pamphlets and books that the museum has collected.

POLITICAL MATTERS "Any way you slice it, there is no denying that this politically declared war has been just about as effective as the war on poverty, the war on crime and the war on cancer put together, which is to say, a complete defeat for William Bennett and his warriors." -William R. Hearst III, 1990.

It has been ten years since Hearst's editorial called for an end to the drug war.  Ten years and hundreds of billions of dollars later, and with tens of millions of American citizens arrested for drug offenses, the war is more of a failure than ever.  It is ironic that one of the key players in the early 1900's in whipping up public opinion about this new drug marijuana was none other than William Randolph Hearst, grandfather of the above Hearst.  The elder Hearst hated the Mexicans for nationalizing his timber holdings in Mexico, and popularized the idea of the violent producing drug from south of the border.  He had large timber holdings in the West and  knew of the potential of hemp in the paper industry.

CANNABIS COMMENDATIONS  This room is dedicated to the millions of persons who are not mentioned here, but that have suffered loss, incarceration, even death due to the 63 years of Cannabis prohibition.

Since this is a museum I would like to include here historical figures that I came across who stood up for or loved the hemp plant or who had some related relationship with the plant.  Many mentioned here did not want to be at the forefront of Cannabis prohibition - Donald Scott comes to mind.  Yet over the years I have been involved, I have witnessed or heard of thousands of Americans who stood up for Cannabis, at risk of loss of their personal liberty, with the government looking over their shoulder.  After listening to Brownie Mary Rathbun testify before the government, I was really proud to share a joint with her on the Capital steps in Sacramento.  Because I'm the Curator here you are going to meet a lot of the people I crossed paths with, while others I will have to search out.  If you are here and don't want to be, let me know.  I want to thank everyone who has ever been to a hemp rally, who ever smoked a joint, bought a hemp product, or voted for hemp medicine, because we have a common mind and purpose.  We want to extend freedom, to ourselves, to farmers, to patients, and to our children, to make up a new life based on natural, renewable, and sustainable resources.

LIBRARY The Hemp Museum Library is made up of several parts, but understand all parts are under construction.

First, THE PHYSICAL HEMP MUSEUM LIBRARY, the material which is physically in the possession of the Hemp Museum.

2.  LIST of hemp related books.

3.  BOOK COVERS with synopses, clips, summaries or definitions.

4.  MAGAZINES either hemp related or with hemp articles.

5.  MEDICAL PAPERS and articles, etc.

6.  LEGAL PAPERS and briefs, etc.

7. LEGISLATION

Second, LIBRARY LINKS,  Links to sites where the above types of literature exist, but are not physically with us, or have more detail, etc.

Third,  THE WISH LIST, a section where we list literature we would like to physically have in the museum, a poster, whatever.

Fourth, OTHER IDEAS, like recommended reading.

If you would like to join the USA Hemp Museum
or communicate with the curator, send an email to

Richard M. Davis:
Curator, Founder, Author

ABOUT THE CURATOR

The U.S.A. Hemp Museum
now has its own personal snail mail box: 

 Richard M. Davis, Curator
U.S.A. Hemp Museum
HempMuseum Publishing
PMB #1-435
8205 Santa Monica Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA  90046-5977

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HEMP FOR VICTORY: A GLOBAL WARMING SOLUTION

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